ADHD


Page Summary in a Sentence
This is an ever evolving page of resources suggested by people who identify with the neurodiverse community on the topic of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.



General Resources


Jessica, the YouTuber from How to ADHD, gives an introduction to what ADHD is.

Better Late Than Never: Understand, Survive and Thrive Midlife ADHD Diagnosis by Emma Mahony.

Emma was diagnosed with ADHD at the age of 52 and explores not only the process of diagnosis in her book, but heritability, variability in how ADHD presents in terms of gender, how to go about seeking support, and ultimately she uses her experiences to suggest and demonstrate ways to thrive with ADHD.


Scattered Minds: The Origins and Healing of Attention Deficit Disorder by Gabor Maté.

Gabor, who has ADD himself, balances this book between being very personal with lots of his proverbial “lightbulb” moments throughout and scientific as he uses his insight as both an individual with ADD and a physician to look at ways of explaining, understanding, and managing ADHD throughout one’s own life. His background as a physician means he does pathologize ADHD in a way which some may find distasteful, but it is a very comprehensive resource which we feel is quite a good recommendation to have a better understanding of ADHD, especially as it provides a good overview of emotional regulation in ADHD.


Order from Chaos: The Everyday Grind of Staying Organized with Adult ADHD by Jaclyn Paul.

Jaclyn, author at The ADHD Homestead blog, wrote this and it is such a wonderful and helpful book which we feel is best described by the intimacy of a review by another ADHD focused author:

Order from Chaos feels like sitting down with a good friend, an honest friend, who is a little further down the road of learning how to tackle and subdue the daily chaos of living with ADHD. If there were an ADHD self-help book group, I’d nominate this book to be at the top of the reading list.”

Kathleen Nadeau, Ph.D., co-author of ADD-Friendly Ways to Organize Your Life

You Mean I’m Not Lazy, Crazy or Stupid?!: The Classic Self-Help Book for Adults with Attention Deficit Disorder by Kate Kelly and Peggy Ramundo.

Kate and Peggy wrote one of the first self-help books here for adults with ADD by adults with ADD and we want to celebrate that, at Practical Neurodiversity we are inspired by and hope to inspire leadership, teaching, and learning within the neurodiverse community. This book is ultimately a relatable self-help book on all things ADHD, although it has been pointed out to us that the book will not lend quite the same sense of relatability to those outwith North America due to certain cultural aspects, it is nonetheless a useful book to consult.


Jessica from the YouTube channel How to ADHD discusses how ADHD is the same condition across gender but may present in a more internalised way in women and how this is often missed by professionals.

Flex Your ADHD

This is a free online community for ADHDers which offers a place to share tips and strategies for navigating the world with others and they seem to have really cool plans for the future, such as body double sessions and zoom yoga!


Stories That Never Stand Still

A free to download workbook designed for and by teenagers with ADHD with the ADHD Foundation. It covers a lot, from the struggles to the positives of having ADHD. In the book you will find sections, such as: The A to Z of ADHD, The Art of Calm, Dealing With It (looks at coping skills for anxiety, anger, frustration, stress), Phone: Friend or Foe, A Day in the Life (a comic strip section), Hooray for ADHD (celebrating the positives), A Letter to a Younger ADHDer, and even a Quiet Colouring Page.

‘Stories that Never Stand Still’ [is] a book celebrating what’s amazing and annoying, fun and funny, incredibly inspiring and wonderfully weird about ADHD. Sharing stories, struggles and achievements, this book gives you an opportunity to learn or remind yourself about the positives of having an ADHD brain.

Dr Tony Lloyd – CEO ADHD Foundation

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For Young People


Stories That Never Stand Still

A free to download workbook designed for and by teenagers with ADHD with the ADHD Foundation. It covers a lot, from the struggles to the positives of having ADHD. In the book you will find sections, such as: The A to Z of ADHD, The Art of Calm, Dealing With It (looks at coping skills for anxiety, anger, frustration, stress), Phone: Friend or Foe, A Day in the Life (a comic strip section), Hooray for ADHD (celebrating the positives), A Letter to a Younger ADHDer, and even a Quiet Colouring Page.

‘Stories that Never Stand Still’ [is] a book celebrating what’s amazing and annoying, fun and funny, incredibly inspiring and wonderfully weird about ADHD. Sharing stories, struggles and achievements, this book gives you an opportunity to learn or remind yourself about the positives of having an ADHD brain.

Dr Tony Lloyd – CEO ADHD Foundation

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For Supporters


Jessica from the YouTube channel How to ADHD teamed up with the ADHD tribe to provide simple ways of explaining ADHD which we thought may be useful for supporters both to help with understanding and for communicating our experiences in the future.

Lindsey tells us about her ADHD, tells us about how ADHD occurs, and explains some things to help manage aspects of ADHD.

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Medication


Jessica, the YouTuber from How to ADHD, takes her stimulant medication on camera before speaking with Dr. Carolyn Lentzch-Parcells about why stimulant medications help people with ADHD and why it is okay to be taking medication as prescribed by your physician. We feel this video is just as important for people supporting or caring for young individuals with ADHD when deciding if medication is something for them.

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Comorbidities


Paul from Asperger’s from the Inside looks at the differences and interactions he sees in his autism and ADHD.

YouTubers, Daniel from The Aspie World and Jessica of How to ADHD, discuss the differences and similarities between ASD and ADHD.

A live stream from How To ADHD with viewers questions and featuring clinical psychologist and ADHD researcher Dr Patrick LaCount discussing the comorbidities that come with ADHD.

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Sleep


Jessica from How to ADHD discusses not only how ADHD affects sleep but also how you can go about getting better sleep zzzzzz…

Noelle Matteson from the Living with Adult ADHD blog offers some tips from her own experience for getting better sleep with ADHD.

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Organisation & Time Management


YouTubers, Daniel from The Aspie World and Jessica of How to ADHD, give tips for better organising your daily life as a neurodivergent individual.

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Emotional Regulation


Jessica from How to ADHD discuss how ADHD, emotional dysregulation, and how to manage emotions.

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Executive Function & Dysfunction


YouTuber Amythest Schaber talks about what executive function and executive dysfunction is and ways to better understand and manage executive dysfunction. Although the video is about autism, it is very relevant to ADHD and neurodiverse individuals more broadly.

Sam, a neurodiverse YouTuber, discusses executive functioning and autism and ADHD.

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Rejection Sensitive Dysphoria (RSD)


Jessica from How to ADHD discusses rejection sensitivity, emotional regulation, and how this relates to ADHD. She talks about her own experience throughout the video and talks with Caroline Maguire who developed a tool to help manage rejection sensitivity. It’s a super validating video.

Purple Ella introduces the concept of rejection sensitive dysphoria (RSD) and explains how RSD feels to her in a very personal account.

Sydni takes an in depth approach to introduce RSD whilst also introducing emotional dysregulation and suggestions for managing RSD.

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Suggestions & Recommendations
We hope you find what you need here, but as Practical Neurodiversity is a really new project and because neurodiversity is so expansive, we will unfortunately not have resources on every topic; so, if there is something you see elsewhere that you feel we should add or if there are resources you would like us to help you find, just let us know by using the form below.

Important Note
As we update and categorise this list some resources may be mentioned more than once due to their overlap between context and certain resources may appear under multiple subheadings of neurotype due to the complex overlaps between neurodiverse ways of experiencing and knowing the world, and we also just want to make sure you are able to find what you are looking for too.